Study: Dampness, mold, and asthma

In the June 2007 issue of the journal, Indoor Air, researchers looked at the public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures by assessing current asthma as an endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of US current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21%. An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Using research from prior studies, the researchers calculated that the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1–4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks. The authors concluded that there is a need to control moisture in both new and existing construction because of the significant health consequences that can result from dampness and mold. The findings demonstrate that dampness and mold in buildings is a significant public health problem with substantial economic impact. To view the abstract visit //tinyurl.com/yuponb.

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